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Yoga for Primary Students

This program is designed to help preschool and kindergarten students start to identify emotions and how they make their body feel. In this course, students have access to five groups of yoga categories, each with three 15-minute yoga sessions and printable yoga pose cards. The categories include: 

I'm feeling frustrated, I want to feel calm.
Classes in this category are: Enchanted Forest, Deep Blue Sea, and Around the World (seated).

I'm feeling mad, I want to feel happy.

Classes in this category are: Hot Air Ballon Ride, Airplane Ride, and If You're Happy and You Know It.

I'm feeling tired, I want to feel energized.
Classes in this category are: Barnyard Bash, Shooting Stars, and Freeze Dance. 

My body is active, I want to focus.

Classes in this category are: One Foot Wonder, Army of Warriors, and Body and Mind.  

I want to take a movement break.

Classes in this category are: My Favorite Yoga Poses, Roly Poly, and Around the World (standing).

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Yoga for Elementary Students

This program is designed for students in 1st - 5th grade to help students continue to identify their emotions and how different emotions make their body feel.  In this course, students have access to five groups of yoga categories, each with three 20-minute yoga sessions and printable yoga pose cards. The categories include: 

I'm feeling frustrated, I want to feel calm.

Classes in this category are: Ocean Breathing, Wiggle to Relax, and Close My Eyes, Open My Brain.

I'm feeling mad, I want to feel happy.

Classes in this category are: This Little Light of Mine, A Trip to My Happy Place, and Sunshine on My Face.

I'm feeling tired, I want to feel energized.

Classes in this category are: Open My Hear, Around the Sun, and Freeze Dance.

My body is active, I want to focus.

Classes in this category are: Tight Rope, Army of Warriors, and Body and Mind

I want to take a movement break.

Classes in this category are: Freestyle- Twists, Freestyle- Forward Bends, and Freestyle- Balance. 

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Yoga for Middle and Highschool Students

This program is designed for middle and high school students and the increase academic demands they have. In this course, students have access to four categories of yoga, each with two 30-minute and two 45-minute yoga sessions and printable yoga pose cards. There is also a section for quick fixes that are 15 minutes long. The categories include: 

Yoga for Anxiety

Classes in this category include: Floor Yoga (30 minutes), Moving Forward (30 minutes), Floor Yoga (45 minutes), and Slowing Down (45 minutes).

Yoga for Self-Love

Classes in this category include: 10 for 10 (30 minutes), Self Massage (30 minutes), Shutting Off & Turning Inward (45 minutes), and Positive Self Talk (45 minutes).

Yoga for Showing Kindness

Classes in this category include: Open My Heart (30 minutes),  Forgiveness (30 minutes), Loving Kindness Meditation (45 minutes), and Gratitude for You (45 minutes). 

Brain Break

Classes in this category include: Yoga Nidra/Yoga Sleep (30 minutes), Sun Salutation A+C (30 minutes), Yoga Nidra/Yoga Sleep (45 minutes), and Twist & Bend Refresh (45 minutes).

Quick Fix (15 minutes classes)

Classes in this category include: Anchor Meditation, Lots of Love Meditation, Fully Body Flow, and Neck & Shoulders.

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FREE: EET Handout

Language is critical for academic success. Without strong expressive language, students can have difficulty organizing and understanding spoken and written language. The Expanding Expression Tool (EET) was designed to target and simplify expressive language by providings structure. As a mnemonic device, it provides both visual and tactile information to promote improved language organization. The EET is designed to be used by teachers, specialists (like speech-language pathologists), and parents to support lanugage skills.

 

Learn More at: https://www.expandingexpression.com/ 

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FREE: Get Ready, Do, Done

Deciding on how to get started on a big project and coming up with a plan for completing it can be challenging for anyone.  However, for students with executive functioning challenges, it can be completely overwhelming. Big projects require students to use multiple executive functions at once-  planning, prioritizing, organizing, evaluating, and initiating each step.

 

The Get Ready, Do, Done strategy allows students to first get a mental picture of their finished product ("Done"). Then they work backwards to break that finished product into steps ("Do") and the materials needs to complete those steps ("Get Ready"). 

 

Learn More at: https://effectiveeffortconsulting.com/breaking-projects-into-small-manageable-steps/

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FREE: First Then Handout

First-Then schedules are some of the simplest types of schedules that we use with our students. It presents what a we need to do now (first) and what we will do next (then). This schedule can also be used for behavior support. When a child doesn’t want to do something we want them to do, we present the thing we want them to do in the “first” and the thing they want to do in the “then.”  This shows them a preferred activity or a possible reinforcer to motivate them to complete the thing they don’t want to do.  We use them proactively (before a problem) and when a child refuses to complete a task. 

 

Learn More at: https://childrensautism.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/first-then.pdf

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FREE: 100 Trials for Articulation Practice

Practicing at home is the best way to help reinforce your child's articualtion. When children are working on sounds in isolation, the only way to practice this is by drilling. We use constant repetition of their sound over and over again. In her book, ‘Children’s Speech Sound Disorders’ (1st Edition- 2009), Caroline Bowen states “there must be sufficient trials within a practice session for any motor learning to take place and for it to become habituated.  Habituation is a step towards more automatic speech output processing”. (pg255) When working on drilling of the sounds in isolation, we aim for 100 or more repetitions of the target sound per practice time. You can use The Loop's 100 Trial practice sheet at home with your child to get them to practice 100 repetitions of their target speech sound.

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FREE: Broken Calculator Math Game

The premise is simple: one or more keys on our calculator is broken! We need to get to our target number without using the broken keys. Seems simple enough, right? The Broken Calculator problems are a great way to practice addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division and allows kids to practice flexibility and quick mathematical thinking.Turn it into a game and see who can come up with the most ways to hit the target number in 1 minute or who can come up with the most creative way to hit the target.

Learn More or Play Online at: https://www.mathsisfun.com/games/broken-calculator.html

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FREE: 2023-2024 EF Planner

Many students with executive function deficits struggle with organizational skills and staying on task. It's crucial that they develop systems and routines to help them stay organized so they can complete work and other tasks in a timely manner. One of the most helpful system is using an academic planner. Your child's planner should include their class schedule, the times they need to study/work on homework, social events, sports, clubs, and anything else that is part of their day.

 

Executive Function skills are something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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Break It Down Graphic Organizer for

Math Work Problems from understood.org

A word problem can be easier to solve when it’s broken down into pieces. Use this helpful sheet to help kids understand and solve word problems

This chart can help.
1. Write down your word problem in the top box. You may want to highlight numbers and key words.
2. In the second box, write down what you know from the information provided in the problem.
3. In the bottom left box, write what you need to find and how to find it.
4. In the bottom right boxes, solve and check your answer

 

Math skills are something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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Graph It Out a Graphic Organizer for

Ordered Pairs from understood.org

A helpful sheet to help kids understand and solve ordered pairs
To graph a line, you have to solve a graphic problem.
The most important step is to find the ordered pairs of x and y that solve the equation in the problem.
1. Write the equation to be graphed at the top of the left column.
2. Write down at least 3 numbers for x.
3. Plug in the numbers for x into the equation to find y. The x and y values become your ordered pairs.
4. Plot the ordered pairs as points on the graph, and connect with a line.

Math skills are something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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Hamburger Paragraph Graphic Organizer

from understood.org

 

Help kids organize their paragraphs using this delicious graphic organizer.
A paragraph is like a hamburger — they both have several layers. Use this graphic organizer to help build a juicy paragraph.


1. For the top layer, write the topic sentence that introduces the main idea.
2. Fill the middle layers with supporting details.
3. The bottom layer holds it all together with a conclusion sentence.

Writing is something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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Persuasive Writing Graphic Organizer

from understood.org

 

 

Help kids persuade someone by organizing their reasons so they can explain their point of view!
To persuade means to make someone come around to your point of view. To do that, you need to build an argument and support it with details. 

 

Here’s how:
1. Choose a topic and your position for or against it.
2. Provide three reasons that support your position.
3. Below each reason, write two facts that support it.

Writing is something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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Pros and Cons "T" Table

from understood.org

 

 

“Pros and cons” comes from the Latin phrase that means “for and against.”
Use this T-shaped table to write about two sides of an issue. Pick a topic that can be debated. Write the topic in the box that forms the top of the “T.” In the left column, list the reasons to support one side of the argument. These are the “pros.” In the right column, list the reasons against that side of the argument. These are the “cons.”

Writing is something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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Sequence Chart

from understood.org

 

 

Whether you’re baking a cake or solving a math problem, it helps to have all the steps written out from start to finish. Use this chart to map out the steps.


1. In the top box, write your goal or topic.z
2. List the steps from beginning to end in the order you need to complete them. Put only one step in each box.
3. In the last box, write the last step. It’s OK to leave some boxes blank if you don’t have enough steps to fill all of them.

Writing is something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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Shapes and Mazes for Tracing

from understood.org

 

 

When drawing and writing in school children need to be able to trace curves, diagonals, zig-zags and more! Tracing helps develop the fine motor skills of ideal grasp, grip strength, visual-motor integration, and visual tracking needed for writing. Kids who struggle with tracing can struggle when learning how to write letter and numbers. 
A fun way for kids to work on pre-writing fine motor skills!

Not sure if your child needs additional fine motor support? Talk with one of our occupational therapist, contact us.

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Step-By-Step Graphic Organizer for Multistep Math Problems from understood.org

 

 

When solving a math problem, it helps to do the work in steps.


Use this chart to map out the steps.

  1.  Write any important math formulas or notes in the box to the left.

  2. In the top right box, write your problem.

  3. Complete the problem, one step at a time. Put only one step in each box.

  4. Write your solution in the bottom right box.

Math skills are something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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The Frayer Model for Learning New Match Concepts from understood.org

 

 

The Frayer Model can help you learn new words or concepts in math.
 

You can use this version of the model to break down a word or concept.
1. Write the word or concept in the middle.
2. In the outer four boxes, explain the word or concept in four different ways

Math skills are something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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The “Spacekid” for Spacing in Writing

 from understood.org

 

 

Having proper spacing when writing is something a lot of children juggle with. To help your child, use the Spacekid!  Have your child place it between words when writing. This helps kids leave enough space between each word.


Print this resource on heavy paper. Kids can choose their favorite spacekid and decorate it using crayons, markers, and other art supplies. 

Not sure if your child needs additional support with their fine motor skills? Speak with one of our occupational therapists, contact us.

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Line It Up Math Problem Organizer

from understood.org

 

 

Sometimes it’s hard to line up numbers and symbols in math problems. In fact, this is one of the most common errors kids can make when solving math problems! Have them use these grid boxes to make sure they keep the place values in the right spot!
 

This grid of boxes can help.
• Use one box for most numbers and symbols.
• If solving for an equation, make sure the equal sign of the equation stays in the same column as you start each new row.
• For other problems, line up each new row by place values (ones, tens, hundreds, etc.).

Math skills are something we love working on with students. If your child needs support, contact us.

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Sensory Symptoms Checklist

 

 

Sensory processing is a topic a lot of educators and parents struggle to understand. You can read more about it in our blog post, but we also put together this Sensory Symptoms Checklist for you to complete if your child is struggling due to sensory issues. Use our checklist to learn more about the different sensory modalities and if your child is over or under responsive.

Think your child might have sensory processing challenges? Complete this checklist and reach out to one of our Occupational therapist.

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